Media Literacy/Bias

Watch your back when Fox wishes well

Summary:

Fox has essentially changed the language in the TV industry with its wishing well, turning a pleasantry into "take a hike."

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A Study of bias in the Associated Press

Summary:

AP is a massive institutionalized bureaucracy that feeds new stories to nearly every newspaper and radio/TV station in the United States and the world. They are so large that top-down control of single news stories is literally impossible. However, our evidence clearly indicates a built-in bias favoring the powerful.

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Cable TV distorts Middle Eastern conflict to Americans

Summary:

As someone who lives and breathes Middle East politics and media, I have had the bizarre -- and frustrating -- experience of watching the current conflict play out on U.S. cable television, and I am reminded once again why many Americans have such a limited -- and distorted -- view of the world.

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Censorship for now

Summary:

If public television producers are forced to not only bleep words but also to pixelate lips, most will simply cut the scenes, no matter how powerful or relevant, rather than see them turned into a joke.

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The case against the media grab

Summary:

The so-called "horse-trading" testimony brought to light one of the giant lies of the daily newspaper business in San Francisco and proved that the out-of-town owners of these papers care more about profits than honest journalism.

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A secret the media kept

Summary:

Toward the end of 1979, hundreds of American and Canadian journalists and news organizations got hold of a dynamite news story that would have made personal reputations and careers and sent circulation or broadcast ratings soaring.

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There's no easy path to diversity in the media

Summary:

According to a new study, the news industry does as poor a job at diversifying as the sports leagues we criticize.

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Bloggers blocked after Mumbai blasts

Summary:

India's fast-growing community of 'bloggers' and Internet users was in for a rude shock when it found favourite sites blocked out in the wake of the serial blasts in crowded trains that killed 200 commuters in the western port city of Mumbai, last week.

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For the Times, the truth matters -- at least if it's trivial

Summary:

When an obituary in the New York Times says that novelist Muriel Spark died on April 13 -- when she really died on April 14 -- well, that kind of mistake requires some extensive research and warrants a correction.

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Washington Post’ puts a happy face version on the Federal Reserve

Summary:

There is plenty of room to debate what the Federal Reserve Board’s monetary policy should be, but the necessary prerequisite for a serious debate is the knowledge of how monetary policy works. Readers of the Post would be badly misled on this topic by an article in today’s paper.

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The media's job is to interest the public in the public interest. -John Dewey