Legislation and Regulation

Copps and Adelstein meet the public in Portland

Summary:

On June 24, hours after the Third Circuit Court announced its ruling against the FCC's deregulation of ownership rules, Commissioners Michael Copps and Jonathan Adelstein convened a Town Hall meeting on The Future of Media in Portland's Convention Center. The Commissioners heard public testimony on a wide range of issues including public interest obligations for digital broadcasters, labor rights and equal opportunity protections for industry employees, local cable issues, abuses of corporate power by Comcast and Clear Channel, and of course the pitfalls of media consolidation.

[ audio: Copps and Adelstein in Portland ]
[ audio: Our Democracy, Our Airwaves conference, June 19 ]
[ The Future of Media program ]
[ Money in Politics Research Action Project ]

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Most US consumers get local news from papers

WASHINGTON, Jan 29 (Reuters) - More Americans rely on newspapers as their source for local news than any other outlet, according to a study released on Thursday by two consumer groups that criticizing new media ownership rules for being based on poor data.

About 61 percent of those surveyed said newspapers

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The sneaky handling of rules that will dilute media diversity

Philadelphia Inquirer editorial, Sat, Dec. 13, 2003

Over the summer, Senate and House members plunked down on the couch with the American public and took a look at the Federal Communications Commission's plan for more mega-media mergers.

Before long, they were all tossing nachos at the television

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Powell Decision Slapped Again and Again

Summary:

A surprise Sept. 3 judicial victory temporarily suspended the FCC?s new media ownership rules set to go into effect Sept. 4, giving federal lawmakers more time to cancel the wildly unpopular rules before they ever become law. In a lawsuit brought against the rules by the Prometheus Radio Project and argued by the Media Access Project's Andy Schwartzman, the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals decided to suspend the rules pending the case?s outcome.

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Media Politics: Study Suggests NAB and NPR Lied to Congress

by Jonathan Lawson

In Seattle, there's no FM station on the dial between the University of Washington's KUOW (94.9) and Clear Channel's KJR (95.9), because of the FCC's rules about how widely stations need to be separated in order to avoid signal interference. The intermediate frequency of 95.3 is

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Study Reveals NAB and NPR Lied to Congress

The five-year policy battle over low-power community radio (LPFM) took an interesting turn this week, with the long-delayed release of a Congressionally-mandated study on LPFM interference. The study, ordered as part of the industry-supported Radio Broadcasting Preservation Act of 2000, is a powerful refutation of claims by the National Association of Broadcasters and National Public Radio, who had argued that low-power FM signals would interfere with higher-power comercial signals on adjacent frequencies. The study, completed months ago, was released this week only after a Freedom of Information Act request and subsequent complaints from LPFM advocates.

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Community Media and Social Change: Media Activism at the ACM

Summary:

On July 9-12, the Alliance for Community Media will hold its annual conference in Tacoma. It's a great opportunity for Northwest community video producers to meet colleagues from across the country, and to attend seminars and workshops on production techniques, media literacy, funding challenges and public policy related to community media.

This year's conference features a special Community Media and Social Change track, in which grassroots producers, media activists and educators can consider their role in the media democracy movement and other social justice struggles. Topics include youth media production, media ownership reform and cable franchise negotiation challenges. Presenters represent a broad range of media and activist groups: Colors Northwest, Hate Free Zone, the Independent Media Center, KBCS, Media Tank, Reclaim the Media and Third World Majority, among others.

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Multiple Congressional Battles to Reverse the FCC

Summary:

As expected, on June 2 the Federal Communications Commission voted 3-2 with Michael Powell to relax media ownership rules--favoring corporate monopolies at the expense of locally accountable programming, diverse viewpoints and competition. Thanks to the organizing, letter-writing and public testimony of hundreds of thousands of concerned Americans, the Powell decision did not go unnoticed. In fact, it instantly became the most unpopular decision in the history of the FCC. Many in the US Congress are already pursuing steps to reverse parts of the decision; this is a good start. On June 19, the Senate Commerce Committee is expected to vote on a bill restoring the 35% national TV ownership cap. Perhaps more importantly, the bill may be amended also to restore the broadcast/newspaper cross ownership ban.

This bill may or may not pass the Senate and the House, where an identical bill has also been introduced. In either event, it is only the beginning in what will be a long-term Congressional battle to reform federal media policy on our terms. It is very important that we let all of our Senators and Congressmen hear from us starting now. Our message for now is simple: Reverse the Powell Decision and Stop Media Monopolies! Click here to send that message right now.

[ Hollings-Stevens (Senate) and Burr-Dingell (House) bills ]
[ Reclaiming the Public Airwaves Act (House) ]
[ McCain on reauthorization bill ]
[ Dorgan on legislative veto ]
[ June 2 reactions: RTM | FMC | Free Press | Copps ]

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Reclaim the Media responds to FCC ruling

Summary:

Local Media Reform Advocates Pledge to Continue Battle despite FCC Ruling

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Seattle Media await FCC decision

Area newspapers and broadcast stations could be affected

By Todd Bishop, Seattle Post-Intelligencer

Owners of the Seattle area's newspapers and broadcast stations will be watching closely Monday as the Federal Communications Commission considers relaxing or repealing the government's longstanding

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The media's job is to interest the public in the public interest. -John Dewey