Communications Rights

Community radio stations promise self-censorship after coup shutdown

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[two stories]

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In Pennsylvania, Verizon's idea of competition is: they win

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Want a level playing field? Then let's keep it local

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Thai junta further undermines press freedom by closing radio stations

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Pres freedom under attack in Thailand, as radio stations, critical websites are shut down

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What's wrong in Oaxaca? Don't ask the Seattle Times

Summary:

Independent filmmaker Jill Freidberg (Granito de Arena, This is What Democracy Looks Like) provides a forceful rebuttal to a recent Seattle Times story in which travel writer Jolayne Houtz paints a woefully uninformed and misleading picture of the current political unrest in Oaxaca. Freidberg has travelled back and forth between Seattle and Oaxaca many times in the past several years, documenting social change movements and the current uprising. In her critique, she teases out how a seemingly innocuous travelogue can gloss over complex political realities, as Houtz blithely dismisses the determined motivations of local folks who have had the audacity to step out of Oaxaca's beautiful scenery to demand justice.

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International press freedom mission issues recommendations to Nepalese government

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Mission Statement by International Organisations on International Press Freedom and Freedom of Expression in Nepal

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San Francisco blogger freed after 30 days in jail, case still looms

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How far does reporters' right to protect sources extend? Are bloggers journalists, for the purposes of these and other legal protections?

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PRI sympathizers shut down Oaxacan community radio station

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Oaxacan community radio station forced to close by armed PRI sympathisers; another harassed by municipal authorities

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Proposed US-Korean trade deal threatens cultural sovereignty

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On September 6-9, Korean and US trade representatives will meet in Seattle for a third set of talks leading towards a proposed bilateral Free Trade Agreement. If approved, the new FTA will be the largest such agreement for the US since NAFTA. Like NAFTA, this agreement is backed by large corporations, and opposed by millions of workers and unions, small business owners, environmentalists and human rights advocates in both countries.

The Korea/US FTA also raises grave concerns in the areas of media policy and communications rights. The proposed deal would place severe limits on the Korean government's ability to protect its own media and cultural industries--dismissing media diversity protections such as film screen quotas as barriers to trade. In fact, the US has already required Korea to slash film quotas as a show of "good faith" before FTA negotiations even started.

Korean and US activists will rally and march against this bad trade deal on Sept. 6 through Sept. 9.

More info: Coalition for Cultural Diversity in Moving Images
Korean grassroots media: Labor News Production | People's Media Chamsaesang | MediAct

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Culture treaty couldn't save Korea from Hollywood

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As a negotiation strategy, it wasn't exactly one for the Korean textbooks. Before free trade talks were officially launched this month between the United States and South Korea, Asia's third largest economy had already caved to U.S. pressure, agreeing to gut a popular policy which has been credited for nurturing Korea's celebrated film industry.

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Oaxaca: free speech in the "dirty war"

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"We've learned and we're defending ourselves. We realized that…we need to raise our voices."

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The media's job is to interest the public in the public interest. -John Dewey