Low income, rural, Native American, African American and Latino communities call for an open Internet

MAG-Net:

In an historic day for the Federal Communications Commission and the Internet, the Media Action Grassroots Network, ColorofChange.org, Presente.org, Applied Research Center, Afro-Netizen, National Association of Hispanic Journalists, Native Public Media and Rural Broadband Policy Group submitted a range of grassroots stories and comments from urban, rural and struggling sub-urban communities in response to the Commission's notice of proposed rule making "In the Matter of Preserving the Open Internet and Broadband Industry Practices."

The groups' comments speak to the urgent need for an open and free Internet for low to no income, rural, Native American, African American and Latino communities.

RTM Note: Reclaim the Media is a member organization of the Media Action Grassroots Network.

In an historic day for the Federal Communications Commission and the Internet, the Media Action Grassroots Network, ColorofChange.org, Presente.org, Applied Research Center, Afro-Netizen, National Association of Hispanic Journalists, Native Public Media and Rural Broadband Policy Group submitted a range of grassroots stories and comments from urban, rural and struggling sub-urban communities in response to the Commission's notice of proposed rule making "In the Matter of Preserving the Open Internet and Broadband Industry Practices."

The groups' comments speak to the urgent need for an open and free Internet for low to no income, rural, Native American, African American and Latino communities.

"Like telephones, the Internet is increasingly an essential part of everyone's daily lives," says Malkia Cyril, Executive Director of Center for Media Justice, which coordinates the Media Action Grassroots Network (MAGNet). "Ensuring strong rules to keep the Internet free and open for communities in the midst of a widening digital divide is fundamental to a vibrant and representative democracy, and cultural and human rights."

The groups say without strong "Net Neutrality" rules to keep content on the Internet accessible to all, communities most in need may end up "virtually redlined" from of the innovation and opportunity that springs from a free and open Internet.

"In a democratic society, every idea must have a chance to flourish and all people should be able to access legal content equally and without fear of foul play," says Amalia Deloney, MAGNet coordinator. "People use [the Internet] to find jobs, access health services, obtain education resources, advocate for representation, increase connection, and its an important tool to build strong and healthy communities in low-income neighborhoods of color."

The groups' comments can be found online here.

article originally published at MAG-Net.

The media's job is to interest the public in the public interest. -John Dewey